ESPN Coverage

Following the Duathlon World Championship race, ESPN published this:

AVILES, Spain — Chris Mosier of Team USA made sports history Sunday by becoming the first out transgender athlete to compete in an International Triathlon Union championship when he ran and biked in the world duathlon championship.

MORE

worlds_running.JPG

VERY COOL!

Dooster!

I’ve heard about these Doosters.IMG_9517They make amazing films. I’ve seen them around, mostly blending into the sidelines, capturing random footage that I’m never sure what it’s for or where it will end up.

Recently I got to spend some quality Dooster time, and it was pretty rad. And while I don’t know what they are using it all for and how it will turn out, I am pretty excited to be a part of it.

interview

IMG_9531IMG_9532

IMG_9547

photo by Dooster

NPR / WNYC

I was lucky enough to be on The Takeaway this week, talking trans athletes and policy.The Takeaway, is collaborative show from PRI Public Radio International and WNYC Radio, with editorial partners The New York Times and WGBH Boston. The program’s goal is to advance an authentic American conversation on issues and topics of importance. I love doing radio shows – so far they have been great conversations and very well edited.

Also, I am impressed (but not surprised) with my friends, many of whom told me they either woke up to my voice or heard me during their morning routine. I love listeners of Public Radio!

Screen Shot 2016-02-25 at 9.52.16 AM

Listen to the short segment here.

IOC opening field of competition to trans athletes with new policy

From ESPN:

The Olympics are reportedly opening the field of competition to transgender athletes by adopting an updated policy that reflects standards already adopted by other regulatory sports organizations.

As first reported by Outsports, in November the International Olympic Committee received new proposed guidelines from its “Consensus Meeting on Sex Reassignment and Hyperandrogenism,” allowing for broader policies for the inclusion of transgender athletes.

Olympics officials have yet to announce formally that the Games have adopted the new guidelines, which can be found on their website. If formally adopted, the potential rules update would bring the Olympics in line with the standards already employed by the NCAA in the United States by allowing both male-to-female and female-to-male transgender athletes to compete without having had surgery.

The Olympics already had rules formally allowing and acknowledging trans athletes’ right to compete but with specific provisions under the Stockholm Consensus adopted in 2004 before the Olympics in Athens: Transgender athletes had to have gender reassignment surgery; they must have legal recognition of the gender they were assigned at birth; and they had to have undergone at least two years of hormone replacement therapy after surgery. The proposed new rules would bring the Olympics in line with the NCAA’s standard of one year of hormone replacement therapy — with no surgical requirement — before being allowed to compete.

Read more.