ESPN Coverage

Following the Duathlon World Championship race, ESPN published this:

AVILES, Spain — Chris Mosier of Team USA made sports history Sunday by becoming the first out transgender athlete to compete in an International Triathlon Union championship when he ran and biked in the world duathlon championship.

MORE

worlds_running.JPG

VERY COOL!

ESPN: The Body Issue

BODYISSUE

It’s official! I am a part of the 2016 Body Issue! I shot my part before my trip to Spain – I’ll detail the whole experience once the issue is released. I am equal parts excited and overwhelmed with excitement (they are little different), but I am so pumped to be a part of this, for a few reasons:

  1. For 29 years, I did not want to have my photo taken. What I saw reflected back (and documented forever) did not align with the way I felt inside, or how I saw myself. I am so proud to be at a point where I am comfortable in my own skin.
  2. I think it’s important for people to see that trans athletes exist, and be an example for others. I am not saying yall need to take your clothes off! I’m just saying, visibility is a powerful tool to fight against oppression and discrimination.
  3. The first thing I said to the reporter who profiled me in October was, “I want to be in the Body Issue.” They passed it on and the rest is history. SO COOL.
  4. I wanted to share my abs with you. 🙂

Look at this list! From the first two paragraphs of the ESPN article announcing the names:

Miami Heat star Dwyane Wade, UFC fighter Conor McGregor, Super Bowl MVP Von Miller and Chicago Cubs pitcher Jake Arrieta are among the athletes who will shed their clothes to appear in ESPN The Magazine’s annual Body Issue.

Ten men and nine women will appear in the magazine, which announced the athlete list for the eighth annual Body Issue on Tuesday. The featured participants include Team USA duathlete Chris Mosier, who will be the first transgender athlete to pose.

Check this link for a sneak preview video, and look for the release on July 6 online and July 8 in print.

Dooster!

I’ve heard about these Doosters.IMG_9517They make amazing films. I’ve seen them around, mostly blending into the sidelines, capturing random footage that I’m never sure what it’s for or where it will end up.

Recently I got to spend some quality Dooster time, and it was pretty rad. And while I don’t know what they are using it all for and how it will turn out, I am pretty excited to be a part of it.

interview

IMG_9531IMG_9532

IMG_9547

photo by Dooster

NYU Moving Up Day

I had the opportunity to be the keynote speaker at the NYU Moving Up Day celebration. It was a great opportunity to think about my journey, because I really began to settle into my identity as a trans guy during my time at NYU and while working in the NYU LGBTQ Student Center. It was a nice opportunity to reflect, share a bit of my journey with others, and celebrate the accomplishments of the amazing students there. And to be celebrated!

 

NCAA Inclusion Forum

The NCAA Inclusion Forum was in Indianapolis this year, and I was able to present again – last year I did a solo session, but this year I teamed up with the LEGENDARY Helen Carroll to present on NCAA Inclusion of Transgender Athletes.

These events are amazing because I get to meet a lot of people and help them create safer spaces for student athletes. But it’s basically a family reunion for me too, because I get to see so many of my favorite people:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

It was a great event – very happy to be a part of it!

IOC opening field of competition to trans athletes with new policy

From ESPN:

The Olympics are reportedly opening the field of competition to transgender athletes by adopting an updated policy that reflects standards already adopted by other regulatory sports organizations.

As first reported by Outsports, in November the International Olympic Committee received new proposed guidelines from its “Consensus Meeting on Sex Reassignment and Hyperandrogenism,” allowing for broader policies for the inclusion of transgender athletes.

Olympics officials have yet to announce formally that the Games have adopted the new guidelines, which can be found on their website. If formally adopted, the potential rules update would bring the Olympics in line with the standards already employed by the NCAA in the United States by allowing both male-to-female and female-to-male transgender athletes to compete without having had surgery.

The Olympics already had rules formally allowing and acknowledging trans athletes’ right to compete but with specific provisions under the Stockholm Consensus adopted in 2004 before the Olympics in Athens: Transgender athletes had to have gender reassignment surgery; they must have legal recognition of the gender they were assigned at birth; and they had to have undergone at least two years of hormone replacement therapy after surgery. The proposed new rules would bring the Olympics in line with the NCAA’s standard of one year of hormone replacement therapy — with no surgical requirement — before being allowed to compete.

Read more.